ANASTREPHA STRIATA PDF

The guava fruit fly, Anastrepha striata Schiner, is one of the most common species of fruit flies throughout most of its range. However, it has not acquired a well-established common name as have others such as the Mexican, Caribbean, and Mediterranean fruit flies. This probably is because it is not considered to be of primary economic importance, although it often is abundant and may be highly destructive to dooryard plantings of some tropical fruits. However, Anastrepha striata is an important pest in the American tropics and subtropics, especially of guavas and other myrtaceous fruits, although it has also been reported to attack mango, mombins, orange and peach. The main damage is caused by the larvae, which feed inside the fruit Norrbum

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Anastrepha is the most diverse genus in the American tropics and subtropics. Currently, it comprises more than described species, including nine major pest species, such as the Mexican fruit fly A.

As some of their names suggest, these pest species cause damage in commercial fruits such as citrus, mango, guava, and papaya. Females lay their eggs in either developing and healthy fruits or in mature and rotten fruit like the A.

The vast majority of species use their ovipositor to deposit the eggs in the edible part of the fruit either the epicarp or mesocarp , and some species such as A. Once larvae is fully mature make a hole to come out of the fruit, and it most happen when the fruit is on the ground. Then, the larva makes a hole on the ground to become a pupa. The life cycle begin again when the female emerge and become mature to produce eggs by feeding on sources of carbohydrate and protein.

Natural enemies are mainly in the families Braconidae and Ichneumonidae Hymenoptera. These species has been released as an agent of biological control of pest species, such as A.

Larvae feed on the pulp or on the seeds. Species of this genus are found across a wide range of altitude and habitats. The gradient of altitude has been documented from 0 - 2. One extreme exception is the morphotype Brazil 1 in the Anastrepha fraterculus complex that attacks peach, apple, cherry and other host in a dry, temperate and high valley system Valle Sagrado de los Incas , Cusco , Peru at 2, m. Common pest species are abundant and found in crops, orchards , backyard trees, and rare species occur in secondary or primary forest, and edges or boundaries of patches of forest between — m.

However, Anastrepha tehuacana was described and documented from a mojave dessert in Puebla , Mexico , and it feeds on seeds of Euphorbia tehuacana. Anastrepha is morphologically and molecularly classified in 23 species group. The Anastrepha fraterculus complex is still a mystery that remains unsolved. This began in when Stone observed morphological differences between populations from Central America and South America.

The conclusion from a group with multidisciplinary expertise is that Anastrepha fraterculus sensu latus comprises eight cryptic species morphotypes with a wide range of geographical distribution. The Immature stages of Anastrepha are poorly known. There are only 20 Anastrepha species with thorough description of eggs which include photomicroscopy.

In addition, larval morphology has not found characters with phylogenetic signal yet. Also, description of third-instar larval is only known from 11 species groups which are mostly represented by one or two Anastrepha species. Thus, collection and description of immature stages of more species is badly needed to identify synapomorphies among the species group. Thorough knowledge of the morphology of Anastrepha is critical to run a taxonomic key and identify species.

Morphological characters on the head, thorax, abdomen and ovipositor are very used in both traditional dichotomous and interactive key. In addition, it is important to know that some species groups in this genus need further revision, so that the identification could be difficult. Knowledge of the larval morphology is important to identify genera and species.

At least, there are three sources which are helpful for identification, but they are out of date to accurately identify larvae up to level of species. There are more than Anastrepha species. This includes seven species from the former genus Toxotrypana , species previously known, and 28 species described by Norrbom in From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Anastrepha Anastrepha suspensa Scientific classification Kingdom: Animalia. Schiner , Females of Anastrepha ludens looking for sites to lay eggs, and ovipositor insertion to lay eggs. Major lineages within Anastrepha fraterculus complex. Taken from Hernadez-Ortiz et al. Wing patterns of major lineages within Anastrepha fraterculus complex.

Aculeus tips of major lineages within Anastrepha fraterculus complex. Morphological characters. Aluja and A. Norrbom Fruit flies Tephritidae : Phylogeny and evolution of behavior. Korytkowski Annual Review of Entomology. Baker Journal of Economic Entomology. Aluja Rodriguez Norbom, A. Castillo-Meza, J.

Garcia-Chavez, M. Aluja, J. Rull Norrbom, Cheslavo A. Korytkowski, Roberto A. Zucchi, Keiko Uramoto, George L. Dallwitz H, Norrbom A. L, Barr N. B, Lewis M. L, Stapelfeldte A. M, Scheffer S. A, Uramoto K, Rodriguez E. J, Sutton B. D, Nolazco N, Steck G. J, Gaimari S. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. Norrbom, Norman B. Barr, Peter Kerr, and Ximo Mengual Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature.

Rodriguez, Gary J. Steck, Bruce D. Sutton, Keiko Uramoto, Roberto A. Zucchi Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington. Annals of the Entomological Society of America. ZooKeys : 95— Clarke ZooKeys : 5— ZooKeys : — Santamaria, K. Lee, A.

Tateno, M. Hanlin, A. Marnell Steck, Erick J. Rodriguez, Allen L. Norrbom, Vivian S. Wharton Steck, Elton L. Araujo, Miguel F. Silva b. Norrbom, Bruce D. Sutton and Janisete G.

Silva a. Carroll, H. Celedonio-Hurtado, and J.

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Olfactory Response of Anastrepha Striata (Diptera: Tephritidae) to Guava and Sweet Orange Volatiles

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible. Continuing to use www. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use. One or more of the features that are needed to show you the maps functionality are not available in the web browser that you are using. Attacked fruits usually show signs of oviposition punctures and very sweet fruits may produce a sugary exudate.

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Its exact native range is obscure, but its presence in southern Brazil has been detected only recently, su Its exact native range is obscure, but its presence in southern Brazil has been detected only recently, suggesting that human activities may have aided its spread. It has also been intercepted and trapped in the USA Florida, California , indicating its potential for spread via infested fruits. This species was first described in by Fabricius as Dictya cancellaria , but this name was long unrecognized and is now considered a nomen oblitum Norrbom, It was described under the valid name by Schiner in For a general description of the genus, see the datasheet on Anastrepha.

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Anastrepha is the most diverse genus in the American tropics and subtropics. Currently, it comprises more than described species, including nine major pest species, such as the Mexican fruit fly A. As some of their names suggest, these pest species cause damage in commercial fruits such as citrus, mango, guava, and papaya. Females lay their eggs in either developing and healthy fruits or in mature and rotten fruit like the A. The vast majority of species use their ovipositor to deposit the eggs in the edible part of the fruit either the epicarp or mesocarp , and some species such as A. Once larvae is fully mature make a hole to come out of the fruit, and it most happen when the fruit is on the ground.

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The behavioral responses of virgin and mated female Anastrepha striata Schiner Diptera: Tephritidae to guava Psidium guajava L. The results showed that flies were more attracted to guava and sweet orange volatiles than to control unbaited trap. The physiological state virgin or mated of females did not affect their attraction to the fruit volatiles. Combined analysis of gas chromatography coupled with electroantennography GC-EAD of volatile extracts of both fruits showed that 1 and 6 compounds from orange and guava, respectively elicited repeatable antennal responses from mated females.

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