HANNIBAL ROSS LECKIE PDF

Hannibal is an epic vision of one of history's greatest adventurers, the almost mythical man who most famously led his soldiers on elephants over the Alps. In Ross Leckie's unforgettable re-creation of the Punic wars, it is Hannibal, the Carthaginian general, who narrates the story, and who is carried by his all-consuming ambition through profoundly bloody battles against the great Roman armies of early empire. In this breathtaking chronicle of love and hate, heroism and cruelty, one of humanity's greatest adventurers is brought to life, who learns through suffering that man is but a shadow of a dream. Most interesting story of a remarkable man, with great persistence in planning and a lot of guts. He deserved better. Typical of petty trading politics as displayed by European colonisers all over the world.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :.

Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Hannibal by Ross Leckie. The frenzy passes. Consequence remains.

Ross Leckie not only presents a vivid re-creation of the great struggle of the Punic wars and the profoundly bloody battle for Rome, but also succeeds in bringing the alm "A battle is like lust.

Ross Leckie not only presents a vivid re-creation of the great struggle of the Punic wars and the profoundly bloody battle for Rome, but also succeeds in bringing the almost mythical figure of Hannibal to life. Introspective, educated on the Greeks, Hannibal has never been presented quite like this.

Written from Hannibal's perspective, this riveting, unique historical novel charts the rise and fall of the great Carthaginian general who came so close to bringing down Rome. A tragic chronicle of love and hate, heroism and cruelty, Hannibal is a dramatic and ultimately nourishing exploration of the inner life and epic consequences of one of humanity's greatest adventurers and most bloodthirsty leaders.

Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published April 21st by Cannongate Books Ltd first published More Details Original Title. The Carthage Trilogy 1. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Hannibal , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details.

More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Hannibal The Carthage Trilogy, 1. Apr 16, Bryn Hammond rated it did not like it Shelves: imagined-fiction. Abandoned p. Nothing else has happened but grisly deaths by torture. The guy doesn't only gouge out the eyes, he bites through the eye-strings.

I've tried to visualise this ever since. I hope he's done his anatomical homework. I direct your attention to a wonderful novel on Hannibal, Pride of Carthage. Nobody bites eye-strings. View all 13 comments. Dec 11, Hilary G rated it did not like it Shelves: abandoned. Ex Bookworm group review: I am sorry, but I gave up reading this book on page 29, just after the fourth sickeningly violent episode. At one stomach-churning episode every 7. I read for pleasure, not to induce a permanent state of nausea.

I also read for my own education, and had this been history, I might, just might, have persevered. But Leckie made it clear this was a novel, and Ex Bookworm group review: I am sorry, but I gave up reading this book on page 29, just after the fourth sickeningly violent episode. But Leckie made it clear this was a novel, and novels are a form of entertainment.

I am not entertained by violence. They just did, now on to the ripping off of penises, putting out eyes, disembowelling guts etc. The depth of detail was not necessary to the telling of the story, so looked like gratuitous violence to me. I would have been very interested to learn more about Hannibal because I and, I suspect, many others know nothing except he crossed the Alps with elephants.

This is the second time in our history that I have failed to finish a book. But as you can see, I can review books whether I have read them or not! This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.

This is a nasty book. If you're expecting to read about Hannibal the famous general, Hannibal who crossed the Alps and gave the Romans the thrashing they deserved, forget it. This is Hannibal the man, one who doesn't care how many die in his pursuit of the revenge-wish he inherited from his father. He takes his wife and newborn baby through the alpine ice and snow, and then butchers some Roman women because the baby dies the death is the Romans' fault--parse that one if you can.

Of course, ther This is a nasty book. Of course, there's also his good side--after his wife is brutally raped and killed by the Romans, he forbids his troops to rape. If you're thinking he's a mess of contradictions, then yes, he is--and it's not helped by the first person narrative giving the illusion of an insight into his motivations and character that isn't really there.

Sometimes, Hannibal, who's writing this narrative as an old man in the expectation of imminent capture, feels the need to justify his actions. Othertimes, even such insufficient justification is lacking. The book would probably have worked better in third person, or with a different narrator, as it isn't able to get under Hannibal's skin and explain how his mind works. At certain points in this book, I had to stop reading because what was portrayed was so viciously and needlessly cruel.

In fiction it would be bad enough; in a novel based on true events, it's unbearable. The book's well written, evokes the violence convincingly, is crammed with period detail, and has elephants. Excellent for those with strong stomachs. Not so good for sensitive souls. View 1 comment. Jan 14, Beorn rated it did not like it Shelves: abandoned , historical-fiction , romans. Very little to launch yourself headlong into an engrossing epic or such like. In fact, at numerous times, it's quite frustrating and takes dedication to even keep reading.

While there's plenty of detail and information on things like the positioning of troops, war tactics etc, even though this sells itself as the story behind the great man himself, there is very little to make you immerse yourself in the story, empathise with any of the characters or make you feel a part of the tale. This all adds together to give a very sterile read and, along with rather pretentious yet discordant phrasing, makes this a hard book to fall headlong into or get the same kind of appeal from as other, more immersive historical fiction.

Considering the previous fiction book I'd read was the far superior Hannibal: Enemy Of Rome by Ben Kane, I come out of this book wondering why I even bothered reading Leckie's version at all.

I loved learning about the Punic Wars in my Classics classes, so I hoped for a lot from this book. Hannibal's an interesting figure, and the lessons never really made me understand him. Not, for example, in the way I understood what drove Alexander the Great. I hoped this book would help, but it ended up being, despite the first person narration, too superficial. I never really felt for Hannibal, through it, and it felt like a history lesson: a lot of dry figures, lists of what he learnt, and pa I loved learning about the Punic Wars in my Classics classes, so I hoped for a lot from this book.

I never really felt for Hannibal, through it, and it felt like a history lesson: a lot of dry figures, lists of what he learnt, and passionless descriptions of atrocities. Oct 14, Motorcycle rated it it was ok.

It was kind of monotone. It was full of big action, but all delivered in a dull tone. And the character didn't conform to my historical impression of him. May 11, Jason M Waltz rated it really liked it Shelves: bios , series , historical. I'll give this 4 stars, though it was a bear to begin. There's a long period of time between my initial handful of pages and my wanting to wrap this book up this week. I read this because I despise the Rome that sacked and salted and stole the cultures and histories of Carthage and Greece and so many others, and wanted to read of Hannibal's victories again.

May 31, Nick rated it it was amazing. An amazing book that is very graphic and not for the weak hearted.

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Ross Leckie Carthage Trilogy Collection: Hannibal, Scipio & Carthage

If Ross Leckie's Hannibal is only the second-best novel about the Carthaginian general, the author's artistry is reason enough to seek it out, even if you've already read Durham's richer and more thorough Pride of Carthage. The story begins in Hannibal's childhood, and a third of the book passes before he embarks on his long war against Rome. This means that the treatment of the famous campaigns is selective and spare, but it is nice to have another version besides Flaubert's of the mercenary revolt, and to have any version at all of the way Carthage expanded in Spain. My only quibble with the treatment of Hannibal's youth is two obvious borrowings from Mary Renault's Fire from Heaven. I'm not sure why Leckie has Hannibal reenact the famous story about how Alexander tamed his war-horse Bucephalis, complete with Renault's embellishments about the horse's mistreatment, or why his hero goes out to kill his first man in battle on a mission so very like that in Renault's book. Leckie's version of Hannibal's story is long on atrocity, packing in more varied forms of torture and execution than you'd expect to find in any three novels.

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